SoulSchool TV Upcoming Teaser : Rickey Rouse of P-Funk and Death Row

My last post on riquespeaks “P-Funk is Hot: Go see ’em”, was a review of last weekend, May 8-10’s Parliament-Funkadelic gigs at Yoshi’s San Francisco in the Filmore distric, in particular the show on May 10. What I didn’t go into in that post was that Calvin Lincoln of SoulSchool Television had the oppurtunity to interview guitar player Rickey Rouse and I was fortunate enough to be behind the camera for the interview. We met up with Rickey at the bands hotel in Oakland. Rickey was really cool as he ran down his dope musical resume. He’s a lead guitarist who also plays other instruments as well as writes songs, and he was well acclaimed in years past for being an excellent interpreter of Jimi Hendrix classic catalog and guitar style. Rouse laid out an engaging musical story, taking him from auditioning in Detroit at the exact same time as Stevie Wonder with Motown, going to hanging out with George Clinton and the early Funkadelics, seeing Sly Stone at his peak, playing with The Undisputed Truth, being good friends with Gary Shider of P-Funk, playing with Chaka Khan, and then problably the work for which he is most known, his studio work with Dr.Dre and Death Row Records at the peak of G-Funk. It’s funny because I had been on a Beyonce trip recently and I was listening to her and Jay-Z’s “Bonnie & Clyde ’03” a record I hated at its release time, because 1) It had the audacity to take a favored Tupac song that was one of the best metaphorical tunes ‘Pac ever released and make it a straightforward rather unimaginative “love” song, and 2) Queen Bey had the audacity to throw in lyrics and melodies from Prince’s “If I Was Your Girlfriend” at a time I was living by “Sign O’ The Times. Basically I was jealous they got to it first on that one.

I also got the chance to tell Rouse that his work on ‘Pac’s “Makaveli” album had a great impact on me, hearing the bass and guitar he laid on that album. On songs such as “Bomb First”, “Against all Odds”, “To Live and Die in L.A”, and especially “Just Like Daddy”, and “Life of an Outlaw”, Rouse laid down beats, bass lines, guitar parts, and other musical treats that expanded my perception of what could be done with live instruments in hip hop, two years before Outkast would come with “Aquemini” and contemporaneous to Outkast cuts like “Elevators.” Listening to those instruments in my AKG headphones late at night in East Oakland made me want to play music too! This interview will be aired Friday and can be seen around the world on http://www.vcat.tv!

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Filed under A little Hip in your HOP, Appreciation, FUNK, Music Matters, Oakland-Bay Area

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